Programs

 *American Legion Boys State is among the most respected and selective educational programs of government instruction for high school students. It is a participatory program where each participant becomes a part of the operation of his local, county and state government.
At American Legion Boys State, participants are exposed to the rights and privileges, the duties and the responsibilities of a franchised citizen. The training is objective and practical with city, county and state governments operated by the students elected to the various offices. Activities include legislative sessions, court proceedings, law enforcement presentations, assemblies, bands, chorus and recreational programs.
High school juniors are selected by local American Legion Posts to attend the program. In most cases, expenses associated with attending this program are paid by a sponsoring American Legion Post, a local business or another community-based organization.

*The Legion annually honors the Eagle Scout of the Year at the national convention. The winner of the competition receives a $10,000 scholarship, and the three runners-up are each awarded $2,500 scholarships.

*The Child Welfare Foundation accepts funding proposals from nonprofit organizations for projects that contribute to the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual welfare of children. Grants are only given to entities that help U.S. children in a large geographic area; they are not awarded for day-to-day operating expenses or special operating expenses. During CWFs annual board of directors meeting in Indianapolis on Oct. 10, The American Legion Child Welfare Foundation awarded $666,670 to 21 nonprofit organizations.

*Founded in 1932, Sons of The American Legion exists to honor the service and sacrifice of Legionnaires. SAL members include males of all ages whose parents or grandparents served in the U.S. military and were eligible for American Legion membership. Members of The American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary and Sons of The American Legion comprise the Legion family, which has a combined membership of nearly 4.2 million.

*Heroes to Hometowns" is a transition program for severely injured service members returning home from OEF/OIF. "Heroes to Hometowns" establishes a support network and coordinates resources for those servicemembers. Last year The American Legion's Heroes to Hometowns Program assisted over 1,100 veterans.

 

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